CHAOS – How to take back control of your life and business

There has been much written this past week about the chaos in the White House.

Chaos provides distraction and noise, which gets people off topic and task.

This is not immune to the White House, however, as chaos is prevalent both in business and at home.

In his book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey outlined the time management matrix.  The matrix was made up of quadrants which broke activities down as being important/urgent, not urgent/important, not important/urgent, and not important/not urgent.

The important/urgent quadrant is where the chaos and crisis occurs.  It is marked by pressing problems and deadlines, and is the place where things must get done.  It is marked by immediacy, and while it may be sometimes be inevitable, it is a place that we should avoid whenever possible.

Instead, Mr. Covey said that we should spend the majority of our time in the important/not urgent quadrant.

This is the area where we plan, look to prevent, and build relationships.  It is where we are proactive, and if done right, prevents the chaos from occurring.

Dr. Wayne Dyer said that, “When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.”

To help us deal with and take control of the chaos around us, we can begin to look at it in the following context:

Commitment – This is where we make the effort to make things better.  Too often leaders put band-aids on problems because they realize the effort that is needed to fix them.  We must commit to the effort in making long lasting change.

Honesty – Honesty is required for us to admit there’s a problem, and what that problem is.  We must also be honest with ourselves with the role that our leadership (or lack thereof) plays in the chaos that exists around us.

Articulation – As leaders, we must ask ourselves if we have properly articulated our vision, mission, and expectations to those around us.  If so, do they understand them?

Organization – Does your organization have clearly defined roles and responsibilities?  While we may strive for a sense of autonomy to do our job, it is important to know what that job is and how it fits into the overall hierarchy of our organization.  If there’s a problem, do your people know the is proper person to report it to?

Source and Solutions – Once we know what the source of the problems around us are, we must come up with a game plan to address them.  Sometimes the solution may involve the hiring and/or firing of personnel.  Other times, it may involve new policies or procedures.  To make effective change, however, you must clear on the source of the problem and the resulting solutions will be ineffective.

Whether it be at your business, the White House, or your own house, we can eliminate the chaos around us with a few simple steps if we are willing to make an effort to do so.

 

 

The traits of a great LEADER

A great leader can transform a business or organization, while a poor leader can destroy one.

Leadership, in its most simple definition, is the ability to influence others while providing purpose, motivation, and direction.

There have been countless articles and books written on this subject, in addition to numerous college courses and degrees in this area.

The fortunate thing for all of us is that great leaders are made, not born, and anyone can learn how to become one if they are willing to put in the time and effort.

To get you started, and keep you on the path, start focusing on the following traits and behaviors:

Listen – There is an old proverb that states, “listen or your tongue will keep you deaf.” Listening is must for any great leader.  If your people don’t feel as if their input is valued, you will quickly lose them.  Also, they may give you insight that you were not aware of which can help you with your decision making.

EthicsEthics refer to the desirable and appropriate values and morals according to an individual or the society at large.  They are also the foundation of a great leader or organization.  There are countless examples of leaders and organizations that have failed because they lost their moral compass during the journey to success.

AttitudeJohn Maxwell has written much about the power of a person’s attitude.  It is the first thing people will pick up on when interacting with you.  A positive person will tend to draw people in, while a negative person will push them away.  Take stock and ownership – does your attitude help or hurt you in your interaction with others?

Discipline – Too often we think of discipline is a negative way, or in terms of punishment.  A highly disciplined leader, however, is in control of their emotions and behaviors.  They do not fly off the handle and put their employees on edge when things don’t go right.  When times are tough, and people are looking for direction, a great leader maintains their composure and leads the way.

EmpathyEmpathy is the experience of understanding another person’s condition from their perspective. Stephen Covey calls this “seek first to understand, then be understood.” People are not robots.  When managing or leading a team, it is important to know where each person is coming from to help motivate and bridge the gap between your expectations and their abilities.

Respect -To earn the respect of others, we must first be able to give it.  Leaders sometime get caught up in their own self importance, but there are simple ways for leaders to show respect to those around them.

Anyone can do it with a little bit of effort, but do you have what it takes to be a LEADER?

How to build and restore Trust in any relationship

They key to successful relationships, whether in our personal or professional lives, is the existence of trust.

Legendary Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz said:

The new player has three questions about the coach, which are the same questions the coach has about the player:

  1. Can I trust you?
  2. Are you committed?
  3. Do you care about me?

Trust requires effort to build, but can quickly be lost if not maintained.

We can achieve, and restore, TRUST in our relationships, however, by focusing on the following:

Truth – First and foremost, the truth must be present for trust to occur.  It is the foundation for any relationship, and requires each party to be honest with one another.

Respect – Each party must also have a mutual respect for the other.  Without it, we may take take the other person for granted and be dismissive of their ideas or feelings.  A feeling of lack of respect is the one of the biggest killers in any relationship.

Understanding – As Stephen Covey stated in the 7 Habits of Highly Successful People, “Seek first to understand, then be understood.”  We may not always agree with someone, but trying to understand why they feel or think a certain way shows that we care and are willing to listen.

Support – A spirit of togetherness and teamwork is required to foster a relationship.  Each party should know they have the support of the other, and know that each is willing to offer a helping hand, or ear, when necessary.

Transparency – While similar to the truth, transparency is providing all of the information with no hidden agendas.  Here’s an example of how one can be truthful or honest, without being transparent:

A wine glass is halfway filled with wine.  You can say the glass is half empty (or half full), and you are telling the truth.  You are being transparent, however, if you say that the 8 oz glass has 4 oz of wine in it.

Trust takes time to build, and can quickly erode, but focusing on the tenets of TRUST can help us to keep our relationships on track.

 

 

Leadership – commit to CHANGE

There has been much written on leadership but in its most simple definition, leadership is the ability to influence others.

In my 10+ years of leadership experience, I have made many mistakes and have learned much through trial and error.

As a result of my experiences, I believe that there are 6 characteristics of a great leader.

To become one, it comes down to a commitment to CHANGE

Competence – If you don’t have an understanding of the area, unit, or section you are responsible for overseeing, a “rah-rah” approach will only get you so far.  Take time to understand what your people do.  You don’t have to get too far into all of the nuts and bolts, but having an understanding of what they do, and how it fits into the organization, is necessary.

Humility – No one wants to work for someone who is arrogant, or has a “know it all” mentality.  Your ability to lead is dependent on your ability to relate to people, and their ability to relate to you.

Attitude – Attitude is everything!  People are looking for direction, and will feed off the energy of the leader.  The type of attitude you bring into your workplace will spark inspiration, fear, or indifference in those around you.

Navigation – In addition to influencing, a leader must have vision and the ability to navigate a team or organization in the right direction.  This involves having the foresight to see what is in front of you and making the necessary adjustments along the way to keep everyone on the right path.

Generosity – Do you give to others without expecting them to help you in return?  Are you generous towards your people with your time or your help?  Do you take the time to mentor and explain?  It is important for us to give to our people and organization with no strings attached.

Ethics – Ethics form the base of a great leader.  There are many examples of leaders who have influenced others, but who have done so in a negative or destructive way.  Our ethics are the guiding force for us to lead with excellence.

Great leaders are made, not born, and we can all become one if we commit to CHANGE.